Bradypodion Fischeri Multituberculatum


Bradypodion Fischeri Multituberculatum
Bradypodion Fischeri Multituberculatum otherwise known as the Standard Fischer’s Chameleon or the Western Usambara Two Horned chameleon is a chameleon species endemic to the Usambara mountains in Tanzania (Chameleon News). This species has a small casque, a dorsal crest with uneven conical scales that reach up to the tail. Like other Kinyongia, it has horns or protrusions which grow from its nose. Like other Fischeri species, they also have long tails which is half of the length of the body. Unlike other horned chameleons, this species has a prominent dorsal crest. The males can grow up to 9.5 inches in length and females can grow up to 7.5 inches. The males have hemipenal bulges that differentiate them from females aside from their size. Males are also more colorful. Both genders have a greenish base color and the males can have yellow, white, bright green and even maroon patches on the sides of the body.

Bradypodion Fischeri Multituberculatum is also known as the Usambara Two-horned chameleon. Its scientific name has also been changed to Kinyongia multituberculata (Reptile Database). All Bradypodion Fischeri are listed in CITES Appendix II so importation of this species is closely monitored (Chameleon News).

References:
1) Reptile Database – http://reptile-database.reptarium.cz/species?genus=Kinyongia&species=multituberculata
2) Chameleon News – http://www.chameleonnews.com/05DecKroo.html
3) Chamowner’s Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_fischeri_%20multituberculatum.htm

 

 

 

 

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Bradypodion Gutturale or Robertson Dwarf Chameleon


Like the Karoo Dwarf chameleon, Bradypodion Gutturale or the Robertson Dwarf Chameleon can be found in the Little Karoo region in the Western Cape, South Africa (Wikipedia). It’s a medium sized chameleon that can grow up to 15 cm in length. Unlike other dwarf chameleons that reside in forests, this can be found in shrubs and other fynbos vegetation. It’s also known as the Little Karoo Dwarf Chameleon.

This species is described to have a robust build and generally grey-olive in color. Bradypodion Gutturale has a pronounced casque and has conical spines from its back up to the tail and also has bright circular spots (lenticular tubercles) on both sides of the body. There is currently no information on numbers and nor conservation data for this species but its range goes as far from the Cederberg Mountains west to Unionsdale east. Due south, they occur at the Agulhas and Robertson plain, hence the name.

References:
1) Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robertson_dwarf_chameleon
2) ChamOwner’s Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_gutturale.htm

 

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Bradypodion Karrooicum or Karoo Dwarf Chameleon


Bradypodion Karrooicum also known as the Karoo Dwarf Chameleon, is found in the dry habitats between the Great and Little Karoo in the provinces of Northern Cape and Free State in South Africa (Wikipedia). It’s a small species of chameleon that can grow up to 14 cm (Chamowners Web). Like other genus bradypodion, its tail is shorter than its body. This species was discovered in 1915 by zoologists Paul Methuen and John Hewitt. It’s suggested to be a subspecies of the Southern Dwarf Chameleon and the Cape Dwarf Chameleon though it’s more similar to the former. However, it is currently associated as a synonym to Bradypodion Ventrale as per the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS).

Bradypodion Karrooicum is described to be mostly gray, brown and sometimes olive with some yellow skin in the throat area as well as some colorful spots on either side of the body. From back to tail is an irregular crest of conical scales. The head has a very low casque (Chamowners Web) and has no occipital lobes. Like the back, it also has a gular crest made up of conical scales. There is currently no conservation data for this species but the data for Southern Dwarf Chameleon may apply.

References:
1) Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karoo_Dwarf_Chameleon
2) Chamowner’s Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_karrooicum.htm
3) ITIS – http://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=715105#

 

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Bradypodion Spinosum or Rosette nosed chameleon

Bradypodion Spinosum also known as the Rosette nosed chameleon is another dwarf chameleon species found in virgin forests and woodlands of the Usambara mountains in Tanzania, East Africa (Chamowners Web). They are also called the Usambara Spiny Pygmy Chameleon (IUCN Redlist). Its most distinguished feature is the rosette-like appendage above the nose (Wikipedia). Though better known as Bradypodion Spinosum, it has been reclassified as Rhampoleon spinosus (Chamowners Web).

Aside from the rosette shaped nasal appendage, Bradypodion Spinosum is known for being colorful. They come in white, yellow, gray, brown, blue, green, orange, red, pink and violet. The head has a high round casque without occipital lobes. The limbs, abdomen and the tail have large lenticular scales (Chamowners Web). The males have a large hemipenal bulge and a tail that’s longer than half the total length of its body. The female’s tail is shorter and they mostly come in brown. This species can grow up to 8 inches or 20 centimeters.

This species is currently on the endangered status in the IUCN Redlist of Endangered Species because of its small area of distribution of below 5000 sq. km. This species cannot handle sudden environmental changes brought about by human habitation. It is also hunted for the pet trade as well as folk medicine and is also listed in CITES Appendix II.

 

References:

1) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosette-Nosed_Chmeleon
2) Chamowners Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_spinosum.htm
3) IUCN Redlist – http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/summary/17632/0/ptint

 

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Bradypodion Tenue or Matschie’s Dwarf Chameleon

Bradypodion Tenue or Matschie’s Dwarf Chameleon is a small species of chameleon found in the Usambara Mountains of Tanzania in East Africa as well as the Shimba Hills in Kenya at an elevation of 1000ft above sea level. This species is arborial or purely forest dwellers (The Chameleon Site).

Bradypodion Tenue is distinguishable from other dwarf chameleons by their gray or brown coloration with some bright spots (The Chameleon Site). It has a slightly elevated casque and canthi rostrales that meet above the nostrils to form a rostral appendage present in male and female though this appendage is larger in males (Systemics of Bradypodion Tenue). They can grow up to 15 centimeters or 6 inches (Chamowners Web).

 

 

 

References:

The Chameleon Site – http://translate.google.com.ph/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.chameleons.com/index.php%3page%3DCustom%26pageID%3D54&prev=search
Chamowner’s Web – http://chamownersweb.tripod.com/chameleon_Family_tree/Bradypodion/bradypodion_tenue.htm
Systemics of Bradypodion Tenue – http://alt.zmfk.de/B2B/6988/1988%20klava%20B%f6hme%20W.%20p381.pdf

 

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Bradypodion Thamnobates or Kwazulu-Natal Midlands Dwarf chameleon

Bradypodion Thamnobates, also called the Kwazulu-Natal Midlands Dwarf chameleon as the name suggests, can be found in the woodlands in the Midlands area of the South African province of Kwazulu Natal (Wikipedia). The term Bradypodion encompasses a group of dwarf chameleons and thamnobates stands for ‘bushwalker’. It averages 6.5 inches or grows up to 17 centimeters.

Bradypodion thamnobates Natal Midlands Dwarf Chameleon 1Bradypodion Thamnobates species is distinguishable for the colorful bulbous scales around the body. It has a yellow crest and white skin on the throat. There are two variants known amongst collectors (chameleonnews) called Nottingham Road which can be gray or brown and the Mooi. River with green, yellowish and blue hues. 

This species is currently on the near threatened status by IUCN because it is often hunted for folk medicine (Wikipedia). This makes trade of the species controlled. There are many kept in captivity in Europe.

 

References:

1) Arkive – http://www.arkive.org/natal-midland-dwarf-chameleon/bradypodion-thamnobates/
2) IUCN Redlist – http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/3017/0
3) Chameleonnews – http://www.chameleonnews.com/10JulDeckersAnderson.html

 

Images:

1) Images supplied by M.Peaker

 

Bradypodion Tavetanum

Bradypodion tavetanum is a West African chameleon also known as Dwarf Fischer’s chameleon and reclassified as known as Kinyongia Tavetana. Its common English name is the Kilimanjaro two-horned chameleon. This species can be found as its last name suggests, in Mt. Kilimanjaro in Kenya but it can also be found in the Northern Pare Mountains in Tanzania. (Wikipedia).

This species averages up to 9.5 incles in length and can be seen in brown green and grey variants. Its distinctive feature which belongs to the males are two saw blade like protrusions or false horns on the nose. Females do not have this feature. Formerly named Bradypodion Tavertanum it has since been reclassified as Kinyongia tavetana. Its name comes from its habitat at the Taveta Woodlands of Mt. Kilimanjaro (farbdrachen.de)

 

References:

 

1) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinyongia_tavetana
2) Reptile Database – http://reptile-database.reptarium.cz/species?genus=Kinyongia&species=tavetana
3) Farbdrachen.de – http://translate.google.com.ph/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.farbdrachen.de/index.php%3Fid%3D53&prev=search

 

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Smith’s dwarf chameleon or Bradypodion taeniabronchum

Smith’s dwarf chameleon otherwise known as Bradypodion taeniabronchum or Elandsberg Dwarf Chameleon, is one of the few species of chameleons that actually changes its color to match its surroundings, an ability (Wikipedia) which has made chameleons one of the most interesting animals and valued as pets. However, this species is hardly pet material since it is critically endangered according to the IUCN Redlist due to its limited distribution of just over 5000 sq. km.

This species of chameleon can be found in South Africa near Algoa Bay in the Cape Province. They can be found in fynbos type vegetation. This species is distinguishable from other dwarfs due to its having a dorsal and gular crest made up of tubercle cones. This species can grow up to 8 inches (Chamowners Web). Their base colors are dirty to pale green while some specimens are rust colored but may be hard to determine in the wild because of their ability to blend into their surroundings. Bradypodion taeniabronchum is listed as endangered in the (IUCN Redlist) and also registered in CITES Appendix II making trade of this species illegal.

References: 

1) IUCN Redlist – http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/3023/0
2) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradypodion_taeniabronchum
3) Chamowners Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_taeniabronchum.htm

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Bradypodion Setaroi or Setaro’s Dwarf Chameleon

Bradypodion Setaroi otherwise known as the Setaro’s Dwarf Chameleon is a small size dwarf chameleon native to the South Africa Kwazulu-Natal region. (Wikipedia).

Bradypodion Setaroi is distinguishable from other dwarf chameleons due to its size which can grow up to only 10 centimeters. It has a low casque with no occipital lobes. There are small skin flaps covered with granular scales on its gular crest. There are rows of plate-like scales on the flanks and its base colors are yellow, gray and brown (Chamowners Web). Like most chameleons, they are sexually dimorphic. In males, the tail is longer than the body while the tail is shorter than the body for females.

This species is currently listed in the IUCN Redlist as least concern. It has a teeming population despite being restricted to a 5600 sq. kilometer area. Its range also happens to be protected. Bradypodion Setaroi has a range from the St. Lucia Estuary in Zululand South Africa up to southern Mozambique (Encyclopedia of Life). This species is also highly adaptable and can be found in coastal dune forests among the undergrowth (IUCN Redlist).

References:

1) Chamowners Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_setaroi.htm
2) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Setaro%27s_dwarf_chameleon
3) iNaturalist – http://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/32953-Bradypodion-setaroi
4) Biodiversity Naturehttp://www.biodiversitynature.com/setaros-dwarf-chameleon-bradypodion-setaroi/
5) Encyclopedia of Lifehttp://eol.org/pages/454048/details
6) IUCN Redlisthttp://www.iucnredlist.org/details/3012/0

 

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1) Main image supplied by
2) Sub image supplied by 

Bradypodion Oxyrhinum or the Sharp-Nosed Chameleon

Bradypodion Oxyrhinum


Bradypodion Oxyrhinum or the Sharp-Nosed Chameleon is also a large size dwarf chameleon native to the Uluguru and Uzungwe Mountains of Tanzania, Africa. It’s also known as the Rednose Dwarf Chameleon (Encyclopedia of Life). This species males have a canthus rostralis which point forward that creates a false front or horn (Chamowner’s Web). The ‘horn’ may often be colored red hence the name.

Bradypodion Oxyrhinum can grow up to 16 centimeters (Wikipedia). It’s distinguishable via its low dorsally pointed casque and forward pointing canthus rostralis for males. Females are smaller than males with lower casques and duller colors (Chamowners Web). These reptiles are often colored whte, gray, brown and ocher. This species was first described quite recently in 1988.

 

References:

1) Chamowners Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_oxyrhinum.htm
2) Encyclopedia of Life – http://eol.org/pages/454046/details
3) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharp-nosed_Chameleon

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