Comoro Island Dwarf, Dwarf Panther Chameleon or Furcifer cephalolepis

Comoro Island Dwarf, Dwarf Panther Chameleon or Furcifer Cephalolepis is a small somewhat ordinary-looking chameleon. It can grow up to sixteen centimeters, half of its length taken up by the curved tail. It has a rich, bright green hue with a white lateral stripe on the sides of its body (Chameleons.com). They can also appear in shades of yellow and dark green. It has gular, ventral and dorsal crests made up of small granular protrusions.

The species can be found in Grand Comore Island of the Comoros Islands in the Indian Ocean East of Africa. Its potential range is the whole of Grand Comore which is 442 square miles. It can be found in shrubs and bushes in humid areas around the island coasts, in forests and even near towns (Wikipedia)

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Furcifer Cephalolepis as LC or a species of least concern in its Red List, as the species is abundant in the Comoros Islands and has a healthy pet trade.  More than 8,000 specimens have been exported between 2004 and 2008 (Wikipedia).

References:

1) Chameleons.com – http://translate.google.com.ph/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.chamaeleons.com/index.php%3Fpage%3DCustom%26pageID%3D71&prev=search
2) CITES – www.cites.org/eng/com/ac/22/E22-10-2-A7.pdf
3) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furcifer_cephalolepis
4) IUCN Red List – http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/176319/0

 

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Jeweled Chameleon or Furcifer Campani


The Jeweled Chameleon, scientifically known as Furcifer Campani is one of the more attractive chameleon species. It’s a brightly colored species with a pale to dark green base color. Three light brown lateral stripes run along its body and its skin is dotted light blue all over. It has a dorsal crest made up of small protruding granules. Its English moniker is based on the bright red spots or jewels on its head while its scientific name is in honor of a French Madagascar resident Dominique Campan. Its genus Furcifer means forked feet. Furcifer Campani is a medium-sized chameleon which grows up to fourteen centimeters in length (Wikipedia).

This species is found in the central mountainous region of Madagascar along with other chameleon species. It lives in grassy savannahs high up the mountains from 6000 to 7500 feet above sea level and has a range of over 14,500 square kilometers from Ankaratra volcano to Andringitra National Park which is vast for most chameleon species. It’s a ground-based species and is often found is shrubs, heathland, mountain grass and sometimes in trees.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists the Jeweled Chameleon as a vulnerable species in its Red List. Its vulnerability stems from human encroachment of its habitat through hack, slash and burn agriculture. Its collection is banned (Arkive) but there are still specimens in captivity for sale bred from earlier captures.

 

References:
1) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewelled_chameleon
2) IUCN Redlist – http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/8764/0
3) Arkive.Org – http://www.arkive.org/jeweled-chameleon/furcifer-campani/

 

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Bradypodion Spinosum or Rosette nosed chameleon

Bradypodion Spinosum also known as the Rosette nosed chameleon is another dwarf chameleon species found in virgin forests and woodlands of the Usambara mountains in Tanzania, East Africa (Chamowners Web). They are also called the Usambara Spiny Pygmy Chameleon (IUCN Redlist). Its most distinguished feature is the rosette-like appendage above the nose (Wikipedia). Though better known as Bradypodion Spinosum, it has been reclassified as Rhampoleon spinosus (Chamowners Web).

Aside from the rosette shaped nasal appendage, Bradypodion Spinosum is known for being colorful. They come in white, yellow, gray, brown, blue, green, orange, red, pink and violet. The head has a high round casque without occipital lobes. The limbs, abdomen and the tail have large lenticular scales (Chamowners Web). The males have a large hemipenal bulge and a tail that’s longer than half the total length of its body. The female’s tail is shorter and they mostly come in brown. This species can grow up to 8 inches or 20 centimeters.

This species is currently on the endangered status in the IUCN Redlist of Endangered Species because of its small area of distribution of below 5000 sq. km. This species cannot handle sudden environmental changes brought about by human habitation. It is also hunted for the pet trade as well as folk medicine and is also listed in CITES Appendix II.

 

References:

1) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosette-Nosed_Chmeleon
2) Chamowners Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_spinosum.htm
3) IUCN Redlist – http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/summary/17632/0/ptint

 

Images:

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Bradypodion Tenue or Matschie’s Dwarf Chameleon

Bradypodion Tenue or Matschie’s Dwarf Chameleon is a small species of chameleon found in the Usambara Mountains of Tanzania in East Africa as well as the Shimba Hills in Kenya at an elevation of 1000ft above sea level. This species is arborial or purely forest dwellers (The Chameleon Site).

Bradypodion Tenue is distinguishable from other dwarf chameleons by their gray or brown coloration with some bright spots (The Chameleon Site). It has a slightly elevated casque and canthi rostrales that meet above the nostrils to form a rostral appendage present in male and female though this appendage is larger in males (Systemics of Bradypodion Tenue). They can grow up to 15 centimeters or 6 inches (Chamowners Web).

 

 

 

References:

The Chameleon Site – http://translate.google.com.ph/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.chameleons.com/index.php%3page%3DCustom%26pageID%3D54&prev=search
Chamowner’s Web – http://chamownersweb.tripod.com/chameleon_Family_tree/Bradypodion/bradypodion_tenue.htm
Systemics of Bradypodion Tenue – http://alt.zmfk.de/B2B/6988/1988%20klava%20B%f6hme%20W.%20p381.pdf

 

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Bradypodion Thamnobates or Kwazulu-Natal Midlands Dwarf chameleon

Bradypodion Thamnobates, also called the Kwazulu-Natal Midlands Dwarf chameleon as the name suggests, can be found in the woodlands in the Midlands area of the South African province of Kwazulu Natal (Wikipedia). The term Bradypodion encompasses a group of dwarf chameleons and thamnobates stands for ‘bushwalker’. It averages 6.5 inches or grows up to 17 centimeters.

Bradypodion thamnobates Natal Midlands Dwarf Chameleon 1Bradypodion Thamnobates species is distinguishable for the colorful bulbous scales around the body. It has a yellow crest and white skin on the throat. There are two variants known amongst collectors (chameleonnews) called Nottingham Road which can be gray or brown and the Mooi. River with green, yellowish and blue hues. 

This species is currently on the near threatened status by IUCN because it is often hunted for folk medicine (Wikipedia). This makes trade of the species controlled. There are many kept in captivity in Europe.

 

References:

1) Arkive – http://www.arkive.org/natal-midland-dwarf-chameleon/bradypodion-thamnobates/
2) IUCN Redlist – http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/3017/0
3) Chameleonnews – http://www.chameleonnews.com/10JulDeckersAnderson.html

 

Images:

1) Images supplied by M.Peaker

 

Bradypodion Tavetanum

Bradypodion tavetanum is a West African chameleon also known as Dwarf Fischer’s chameleon and reclassified as known as Kinyongia Tavetana. Its common English name is the Kilimanjaro two-horned chameleon. This species can be found as its last name suggests, in Mt. Kilimanjaro in Kenya but it can also be found in the Northern Pare Mountains in Tanzania. (Wikipedia).

This species averages up to 9.5 incles in length and can be seen in brown green and grey variants. Its distinctive feature which belongs to the males are two saw blade like protrusions or false horns on the nose. Females do not have this feature. Formerly named Bradypodion Tavertanum it has since been reclassified as Kinyongia tavetana. Its name comes from its habitat at the Taveta Woodlands of Mt. Kilimanjaro (farbdrachen.de)

 

References:

 

1) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinyongia_tavetana
2) Reptile Database – http://reptile-database.reptarium.cz/species?genus=Kinyongia&species=tavetana
3) Farbdrachen.de – http://translate.google.com.ph/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.farbdrachen.de/index.php%3Fid%3D53&prev=search

 

Images:

1) Awaiting images

 

Smith’s dwarf chameleon or Bradypodion taeniabronchum

Smith’s dwarf chameleon otherwise known as Bradypodion taeniabronchum or Elandsberg Dwarf Chameleon, is one of the few species of chameleons that actually changes its color to match its surroundings, an ability (Wikipedia) which has made chameleons one of the most interesting animals and valued as pets. However, this species is hardly pet material since it is critically endangered according to the IUCN Redlist due to its limited distribution of just over 5000 sq. km.

This species of chameleon can be found in South Africa near Algoa Bay in the Cape Province. They can be found in fynbos type vegetation. This species is distinguishable from other dwarfs due to its having a dorsal and gular crest made up of tubercle cones. This species can grow up to 8 inches (Chamowners Web). Their base colors are dirty to pale green while some specimens are rust colored but may be hard to determine in the wild because of their ability to blend into their surroundings. Bradypodion taeniabronchum is listed as endangered in the (IUCN Redlist) and also registered in CITES Appendix II making trade of this species illegal.

References: 

1) IUCN Redlist – http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/3023/0
2) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradypodion_taeniabronchum
3) Chamowners Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_taeniabronchum.htm

Images:

1) Awaiting images

 

Bradypodion Setaroi or Setaro’s Dwarf Chameleon

Bradypodion Setaroi otherwise known as the Setaro’s Dwarf Chameleon is a small size dwarf chameleon native to the South Africa Kwazulu-Natal region. (Wikipedia).

Bradypodion Setaroi is distinguishable from other dwarf chameleons due to its size which can grow up to only 10 centimeters. It has a low casque with no occipital lobes. There are small skin flaps covered with granular scales on its gular crest. There are rows of plate-like scales on the flanks and its base colors are yellow, gray and brown (Chamowners Web). Like most chameleons, they are sexually dimorphic. In males, the tail is longer than the body while the tail is shorter than the body for females.

This species is currently listed in the IUCN Redlist as least concern. It has a teeming population despite being restricted to a 5600 sq. kilometer area. Its range also happens to be protected. Bradypodion Setaroi has a range from the St. Lucia Estuary in Zululand South Africa up to southern Mozambique (Encyclopedia of Life). This species is also highly adaptable and can be found in coastal dune forests among the undergrowth (IUCN Redlist).

References:

1) Chamowners Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_setaroi.htm
2) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Setaro%27s_dwarf_chameleon
3) iNaturalist – http://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/32953-Bradypodion-setaroi
4) Biodiversity Naturehttp://www.biodiversitynature.com/setaros-dwarf-chameleon-bradypodion-setaroi/
5) Encyclopedia of Lifehttp://eol.org/pages/454048/details
6) IUCN Redlisthttp://www.iucnredlist.org/details/3012/0

 

Images:

1) Main image supplied by
2) Sub image supplied by 

Bradypodion Oxyrhinum or the Sharp-Nosed Chameleon

Bradypodion Oxyrhinum


Bradypodion Oxyrhinum or the Sharp-Nosed Chameleon is also a large size dwarf chameleon native to the Uluguru and Uzungwe Mountains of Tanzania, Africa. It’s also known as the Rednose Dwarf Chameleon (Encyclopedia of Life). This species males have a canthus rostralis which point forward that creates a false front or horn (Chamowner’s Web). The ‘horn’ may often be colored red hence the name.

Bradypodion Oxyrhinum can grow up to 16 centimeters (Wikipedia). It’s distinguishable via its low dorsally pointed casque and forward pointing canthus rostralis for males. Females are smaller than males with lower casques and duller colors (Chamowners Web). These reptiles are often colored whte, gray, brown and ocher. This species was first described quite recently in 1988.

 

References:

1) Chamowners Web – http://chamownersweb.net/chamfamily/bradypodion/bradypodion_oxyrhinum.htm
2) Encyclopedia of Life – http://eol.org/pages/454046/details
3) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharp-nosed_Chameleon

Images:

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Bradypodion Pumilum or Cape Dwarf Chameleon

Bradypodion Pumilum otherwise known as the Cape Dwarf Chameleon is a medium size dwarf chameleon native to the region around Cape Town in South Africa (Wikipedia). This species gets its common name due to its location.

Bradypodion Pumilum has a base color of green, yellow or brown with blue, orange and red stripes or spots on their flanks (Chameleons.com). It has a curly prehensile tail, a non-prominent casque. They also have conical tubercles stretching from their backs to their tails as well as beneath the jaw.


This species can grow up to 15 centimeters in adulthood. They are quick to grow from birth to adult size in six months which makes them popular among lizard enthusiasts (Sticky Tongue Farms) and they can quickly reproduce of up to 15 young per year (Herpcenter). This species is adaptable and can be tamed with constant gentle contact (Wikipedia). Unlike other chameleons, they are not as territorial and can be found in groups (Herpcenter).
Bradypodion Pumilum or Cape Dwarf Chameleon 2

Bradypodion Pumilum is listed in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) Appendix II (Wikipedia). This means that trade for this species is highly regulated due to its limited distribution in the Western Cape, South Africa. They are also allegedly found in Namibia and Mozambique (Reptile Database). There are plenty of specimens in captivity and has a limited market (Sticky Tongue Farms). This species inhabits thickets, reed beds and fynbos or shrubbery.

 

 

References:

1) Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_dwarf_chameleon
2) Sticky Tongue Farms –
http://www.stickytonguefarms.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&category_id=15&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=377&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=82&vmcchk=1&Itemid=82
3) Herpcenter Network – http://www.herpcenter.com/reptile-caresheets/cape-dwarf-chameleon.html
4) Chameleons.com – http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://www.chamaeleons.com/index.php%3Fpage%3DCustom%26pageID%3D53&prev=/search%3Fq%3DBradypodion%2Bpumilum%26start%3D10%26safe%3Doff%26sa%3DN%26biw%3D1366%26bih%3D633

Images:

1) Main image supplied by Funky Melody
2) Sub image supplied by Funky Melody